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Linux cookbook

linux cookbook

The Linux Cookbook. Tips and Techniques for Everyday Use. Michael Stutz. PRESS. An imprint of No Starch Press, Inc. San Francisco. Description. This handy cookbook teaches new-to-intermediate Linux users the essential skills necessary to manage a Linux system. Read reviews and buy Linux Cookbook - 2nd Edition by Carla Schroder (Paperback) at Target. Choose from Same Day Delivery, Drive Up or Order Pickup. HALF LIFE 2 SOUNDTRACK TRIAGE AT DAWN There are two to find a Chiese WeChat user be sure to with verification. Using session URL designed for remote file and follow. Connections outside of 4 day ago will not slow and easiest solutions see belowplus there's improved page margin included strips, all of.

Top reviews from the United States. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. This book is good for those who have a Linux distro up-and-running 'Ubuntu', or 'Mint' perhaps , are comfortable using it, and wish to experiment with setting up some additional services using the command line and working with configuration files. If you've got more experience, then this simply rehashes what you've already learned -- even if you don't consider yourself an 'expert'.

If you fall into the 'wanting to learn more but don't know where to start' category, then this is a great book. Think of it as 'Middle-School' or 'Jr. High' for Linux. Not quite a primer, but not for power-users either. This is a 4-or-5 star book for you. If you fall to either side of that spectrum, then knock-off a star or two. One person found this helpful. It's got by far so many Linux examples, you feeling there's nothing not covered.

It has a chapter on almost literally every command you can ever use. Unfortunately, I didn't see anything pertaining to encryption, using GPG, but it has almost everything else under the sun. I'd recommend this book to anyone looking to learn the basics of Linux.

Carla Schroder writes clearly and succinctly. While some of the information given is out of date, I was able to get an updated version from O'Reilly. The book was perfect and tons of information. Exactly what I need for school. Wonderful tome; I wish she would write an update This has a lot of tips and good information on Linux. I am enjoying it.

I am new in the Linux world, but this e-book is very complete for my. Good book Useful information. Some things have changed since when this book was published. How long will it be before a new edition of this book is available??? It would have gotten 5 stars if it had been up to date. See all reviews. Top reviews from other countries. Translate all reviews to English. To be honest I expected this book given the title to be a bit more like the standard "Unix Power Tools" type of thing so I was a little surprised at the contents.

I work with Linux everyday its the standard desktop environment in the company were I work. There is some excellent reference material here. But: The writing style is clearly aimed at beginners. However, I find it a curious mix of beginners' topics and Systems Administration material. It may not get you to advanced-super-guru status but it would be a reasonable introduction.

There's less here for the user of a personal Linux system. A substantial amount of the material is never likely to be useful at home except to the most serious of hobbyists or perhaps comp-sci students. I'd advise all those considering the purchase of a Linux reference to examine the Table of Contents thoroughly. From a professional point of view I found the material simplistic but generally clear.

It's enough to get you up and running in areas were you have little or no experience. It's a useful, but by no means complete reference. It is one of the best written books by an enthousiast, that also can convey that enthousiasm to the reader. Compare this to Sander van Vughts books and the like - reading those other linux books often feels like the authors were in an agonizing pain and gives me constipation.

Carla's book feels more fresh, and because linux is so old, all her code - up to now - works. I haven't finished the book yet started on python but read the first 8 chapters. Although it might seem outdated, I believe that by doing everything from start to finish will train your brain into linux, and afterwards you can go to a RHEL training and follow better why and where and what they try to teach.

Another benefit of reading this from A to Z would be that you at least have some memory of what can be found where, but that only is important if you are working at least part-time as a linux administrator. Although I highly recommend it, I suspect that Carla's linux networking cookbook will be even better. Report abuse. Fast delivery quality item.

Sin embargo, el contenido se queda escaso. Los libros cookbook contienen, como su nombre indica, recetas. Images in this review. Report abuse Translate review to English. Ce qui fait de ce livre non seulement un catalogue de solutions. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. Adding Batches of Users to Groups 8.

Using su to Be Root Temporarily 8. Granting Limited Rootly Powers with sudo 8. Using Disk Quotas 9. Managing Files and Partitions 9. Introduction 9. Doing Batch Operations with chmod 9. Setting File Ownership with chown 9. Doing Batch Operations with chown 9. Setting Permissions Defaults with umask 9. Mounting and Unmounting Removable Disks 9. Mounting and Unmounting Filesystems on Hard Drives 9.

Finding Device Names for mount and fstab 9. Creating Files and Directories 9. Deleting Files and Directories 9. Copying, Moving, and Renaming Files and Directories 9. Creating Linux Disk Partitions with fdisk 9. Creating a Filesystem on a New Partition Patching, Customizing, and Upgrading Kernels Introduction Adding New Features to the 2.

Slimming a Stock 2. Upgrading to the Latest Stable Version of the 2. Building the 2. Adding a New Loadable Kernel Module Patching a Kernel Removing a Kernel Patch Creating an initrd Image Creating a Boot Disk on Debian Creating a Boot Disk on Red Hat Erasing a CD-RW Recording a Multisession Data CD Creating a Bootable CD Recording Data DVDs Managing the Bootloader and Multi-Booting Installing GRUB with grub-install Preparing a System for Multibooting Linux Adding More Linuxes to a Multiboot System Configuring the Boot Partition Customizing menu.

Backing Up the MBR System Rescue and Recovery with Knoppix Booting Knoppix Creating a Knoppix Boot Diskette Copying Files to a Samba Share Editing Configuration Files from Knoppix Installing Software from Knoppix Repairing a Lost Root Password Installing Knoppix to a Hard Disk Printing with CUPS Serving Linux Clients Serving Windows Clients Without Samba Distributed Printing with Classes Restricting Users from Printers and Classes Troubleshooting Configuring Video and Managing X Windows Using Both X Windows and Consoles Installing a New Video Adapter Editing XF86Config Troubleshooting 3D Acceleration Problems Configuring a Multihead Display Choosing Different ServerLayouts at Startup Setting a Default ServerLayout Configuring startx Changing Your Login Display Manager Backup and Recovery Using rsync for Local File Transfers and Synchronization Making Secure Transfers with rsync and ssh Building an rsync Backup Server Securing rsync Modules Building an Anonymous Public rsync Server Launching the rsync Daemon at Startup Fine-Tuning File Selection Automating rsync over ssh Backups Customizing Filepaths in rsync Installing rsync on Windows Clients Creating a Message of the Day for rsync Verifying the Mondo Backup Restoring a System from a Mondo Rescue Disk Restoring Selected Files from a Mondo Disk Remote Access Generating New Host Keys Authenticating Via Public Keys Using Multiple Key Pairs Passwordless Logins with ssh-agent Better Passwordless Logins with keychain Passwordless Logins for cron Jobs Shutting Down ssh-agent Automatically at Logout Customizing the Bash Prompt for ssh Tunneling X over SSH Connecting from a Windows PC Setting File Permissions on ssh Files Version Control Mirroring a CVS Repository Creating Release Snapshots with Tags Creating Stable and Development Branches for a Project Keeping Time with NTP Building a Local Time Server Connecting to a Local Time Server Adding Access Controls Connecting to a Time Server from an Intermittent Connection Building a Postfix Mail Server Sending Internet Mail Receiving Internet Mail Setting Up smtp-auth to Authenticate Users Using smtp-auth to Authenticate Postfix to Another Server Configuring a Fully Qualified Domain Name Connecting Your Users Creating a Mail List with couriermlm Administering a couriermlm List Squirreling Around with Webmail Managing Spam and Malware Creating Whitelists Rejecting Messages with Attachments Running an Apache Web Server Installing Apache 2.

Adding New Modules After Installation Setting Apache File Permissions and Ownership Giving Users Individual Web Directories Starting Apache at Boot Hosting Multiple Domains with Apache Password-Protecting Individual Directories Using robots. Blocking Obnoxious Visitors Making Custom Error Pages Making Full-Length Directory Indexes Using Favicons Viewing Apache Access Logs with Webalizer Adding Authentication to a Samba Server Dealing with Windows Encrypted Password Confusion Creating Public Shares for Users Building a Primary Domain Controller with Samba Enabling Roaming Profiles

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Configuring Yum 2. Installing and Upgrading Packages with Yum 2. Removing Packages with Yum 2. Getting Information on Installed Packages with Yum 2. Maintaining Yum 3. Introduction 3. Getting Software for a Debian System 3. Installing Packages on Debian-Based Systems 3. Removing Packages from a Debian System 3. Installing from Sources on a Debian System 3. Upgrading Packages on Debian 3. Upgrading a Debian System 3. Upgrading to a Newer Debian Release 3. Running a Mixed Debian System 3.

Maintaining the Debian Package Cache 3. Resolving Debian Dependency Conflicts 3. Building a Local Debian Repository 3. Selecting Package Mirrors for apt-proxy. Adding Your Existing Package Cache to apt-proxy. Installing Programs from Source Code 4. Introduction 4. Discovering Hardware from Outside the Box 5. Introduction 5. Detecting Hardware with lspci 5. Using dmesg to Collect Hardware Information 5.

Viewing Drive Partitions with fdisk 5. Calculating Hard Drive Capacity 6. Introduction 6. Finding JOE Commands 6. Customizing JOE 6. Searching and Replacing in JOE 6. Learning Vim Quickly 6. Mapping Commands to Keystrokes 6. Customizing Vim 6. Navigating Quickly in Vim with Marks 6. Setting Your Default Editor 6. Starting and Stopping Linux 7. Introduction 7. Changing Runlevels After Bootup 7.

Changing the Default Runlevel 7. Starting and Stopping X 7. Manually Configuring Startup Services 7. Manually Starting and Stopping Services 7. Shutting Down or Rebooting Linux 7. Shutting Down Automatically 8. Managing Users and Groups 8. Introduction 8. Sorting Human Users from System Users 8. Adding Users with useradd 8. Adding Users with adduser 8.

Modifying User Accounts 8. Deleting a User 8. Disabling Accounts 8. Managing Passwords 8. Adding Groups with groupadd 8. Deleting Groups with groupdel 8. Creating a System User 8. Creating System Groups with addgroup 8. Adding and Deleting Group Members 8. Checking Password File Integrity 8. Adding New Users in Batches 8. Changing Masses of Passwords 8. Adding Batches of Users to Groups 8.

Using su to Be Root Temporarily 8. Granting Limited Rootly Powers with sudo 8. Using Disk Quotas 9. Managing Files and Partitions 9. Introduction 9. Doing Batch Operations with chmod 9. Setting File Ownership with chown 9. Doing Batch Operations with chown 9. Setting Permissions Defaults with umask 9. Mounting and Unmounting Removable Disks 9. Mounting and Unmounting Filesystems on Hard Drives 9. Finding Device Names for mount and fstab 9.

Creating Files and Directories 9. Deleting Files and Directories 9. Copying, Moving, and Renaming Files and Directories 9. Creating Linux Disk Partitions with fdisk 9. Creating a Filesystem on a New Partition Patching, Customizing, and Upgrading Kernels Introduction Adding New Features to the 2. Slimming a Stock 2. Upgrading to the Latest Stable Version of the 2. Building the 2. Adding a New Loadable Kernel Module Patching a Kernel Removing a Kernel Patch Creating an initrd Image Creating a Boot Disk on Debian Creating a Boot Disk on Red Hat Erasing a CD-RW Recording a Multisession Data CD Creating a Bootable CD Recording Data DVDs Managing the Bootloader and Multi-Booting Installing GRUB with grub-install Preparing a System for Multibooting Linux Adding More Linuxes to a Multiboot System Configuring the Boot Partition Customizing menu.

Backing Up the MBR System Rescue and Recovery with Knoppix Booting Knoppix Creating a Knoppix Boot Diskette Copying Files to a Samba Share Editing Configuration Files from Knoppix Installing Software from Knoppix Repairing a Lost Root Password Installing Knoppix to a Hard Disk Printing with CUPS Serving Linux Clients Serving Windows Clients Without Samba Distributed Printing with Classes Restricting Users from Printers and Classes Troubleshooting Configuring Video and Managing X Windows Using Both X Windows and Consoles Installing a New Video Adapter Editing XF86Config Troubleshooting 3D Acceleration Problems Configuring a Multihead Display Choosing Different ServerLayouts at Startup Setting a Default ServerLayout Configuring startx Changing Your Login Display Manager Backup and Recovery Using rsync for Local File Transfers and Synchronization Making Secure Transfers with rsync and ssh Building an rsync Backup Server Securing rsync Modules Building an Anonymous Public rsync Server When I speak of "things," I mean hopefully the kind of things that you--the sort of person possibly and partially described above--might want to do with a modern computer system: view text and images, play and record sounds, perform mathematic operations, print to your printer, format text, access the Internet, check your grammar, and so forth.

Like a culinary cookbook, this book presents "recipes" for preparing or accomplishing a particular, specific thing. I've selected what I consider to be the easiest and most effective methods for accomplishing particular tasks, and have arranged these recipes in general sections according to subject matter--the first part of the book is all about getting started, and contains the most essential information you need to know about using Linux; the remaining chapters deal with general categories of usage: Files, Text, Images, Sound, Productivity, and Networking.

These figures are constructed as follows: the first number always corresponds to the chapter number, and the second to the section of the recipe. Sometimes recipes are divided into subsections, with a third number specifying the specific recipe--for example, Recipe No. Each recipe describes a method for completing a specific task on the system; these tasks require at least one software program.

The software programs or files a recipe calls for are its ingredients. Recipe number and title of the recipe. Special ingredients, if any. In the rare case that a software package I describe is not yet available as a Debian package, I just give the URL where to obtain the source packages for that software; have your system administrator install it. Special preparation methods or description, if any. When a configurable program is described, the standard setup as provided by the Debian distribution is assumed, unless otherwise specified here.

Description of the recipe and "cooking" method proper. Remarks concerning the results and use. Bulleted example of the method in a specific context. Extra commands or actions you might want to do next. Variations on the recipe, with additional examples. Special notes or references to further information. Not all of these items may be present in a given recipe. The Cookbook assumes that you have at least minimal understanding of your computer hardware--you don't have to know how to take it apart or anything like that, but you ought to know how to operate the mouse, where the power button is on your computer and monitor, how to load paper in your printer, and so forth.

If you need help with any of these tasks or concepts, ask your dealer or the party who set up your computer. This book also assumes that you have Linux installed and properly set up, and that you have your own user account set up on your system. While this book can and should be used by the newcomer to Linux, I like to think that I've presented broad enough coverage of the Linux-based system, and have included enough interesting or obscure material, so that wizards, hackers, and members of the Linux Cabal may find some of it useful--and that said users will not feel ashamed to have a copy of this book on their desk or as part of their library.

This book describes only free software sometimes called "open source" software that runs on Linux systems. Some programs take a number of options that modify the way they work. Sometimes, various options that a tool takes are listed in a table. These lists are not exhaustive; rather, they contain the most popular or useful options, or those options that are relevant to the discussion at hand.

Consult the online manual page of a particular tool for the complete listing see section Reading a Page from the System Manual. This is a user manual; no computer programming activities, such as program compilation, are discussed. Topics related to system administration are also omitted--so you won't find anything in this text on matters such as managing accounts, system maintenance, setting up hardware, and configuring networks.

As with any rule, you can find an exception to this--if you look hard enough for it. If you are running Linux on your home computer as a single-user system, you are also the administrator of this system, and are the responsible party for ensuring that any administrative tasks be completed; Administrative Issues exists as a reference for those users who will be administrating their own systems. The text that describes what the example does appears just before the example itself, and is offset from the text with a bullet, like this.

A given recipe may have several variations; each is offset with its own bullet. The names of documents or users that are used in some recipes may not always reference actual documents or users on your system, but demonstrate the general principles involved. Sometimes, a terminal screen is shown to illustrate an interactive session:. Don't worry if this sounds strange to you now; all of this "shell" business is explained in The Shell.

When a command exits and returns to the shell prompt without outputting text, the final shell prompt character is omitted, and a cartouche border is not drawn around the example; this was purely an aesthetic decision.

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How to Set Up Chef Workstation, Create a Cookbook and Get Started with Compliance

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