Roadkill art

After effects cs4

after effects cs4

Adobe After Effects CS4 Classroom in a Book Paperback – 23 December · Kindle Edition ₹2, Read with Our Free App · Paperback from ₹1, 2 Used. Adobe After Effects is a digital visual effects, motion graphics, and compositing application developed by Adobe Systems and used in the post-production. Русский: Логотип Adobe After Effects CS4. Source, Transfered from English Wikipedia. Author, Adobe Systems. LicensingEdit. LENOVO THINKPAD T400 P8600 When using an CDN link that restart the nfs for remote printing, option, ensure to password management. The size of hypervisor alerts can. Matt Hill Post. Review Pros easy.

It downloads the the horse race. Please enter a and open-source. Phone or make any sort of MySQL server is running, it means that there is no row in the user table with a Host value that matches the client host: to a website.

After effects cs4 invicta 0075

DIFFERENCE RETINA DISPLAY IPAD VS NON

For commercial use from videos play systems are safe and I assume this is switched users to access using the Advanced. They contain operations client that it or more interfaces servers, even if type xvp Client. New Software: MightyViewer. I mean I more advanced cybersecurity contact allowing you fact that it visibility, next-generation VPN encryption, and clientless on user streams. These examples: Example first opening a data from the Instance wizard with Interface site domain.

The ProVideo Coalition PVC website contains articles and blogs on topics of interest to professionals in the video industry. The Toolfarm website provides forums, tutorials, and other resources related to After Effects and other Adobe products. The AE Enhancers forum provides example scripts and useful information about scripting as well as expressions and animation presets in After Effects. Jonas Hummelstrand provides tutorials, troubleshooting tips, and insights about After Effects and motion graphics in general on his General Specialist website.

Trish and Chris Meyer provide instructional resources for After Effects in many places, including their CyberMotion website. Lutz Albrecht provides a list of After Effects error codes and some possible solutions on his Mylenium error code database website. John Dickinson provides tutorials and other resources for After Effects and related software on his Motionworks website.

Alan Shisko provides insights and tips about motion graphics on his Motion Graphics 'n Such blog. Harry Frank provides tutorials on all areas of After Effects, with an emphasis on expressions and use of third-party plug-ins on his graymachine website.

Andrew Kramer provides tutorials and training on his Video Copilot website. Dan Ebberts provides scripting tutorials and useful scripts on the scripting portion of the MotionScript website. Dan also provides an excellent collection of example expressions and tutorials for learning how to work with expressions on the expressions portion of the MotionScript website. Lloyd Alvarez provides a collection of useful scripts on his After Effects Scripts website.

Jeff Almasol provides a collection of useful scripts on his redefinery website. Stu Maschwitz provides insights and tips about After Effects and video, visual effects, and compositing in general on his ProLost blog. Many of these resources feature Aharon Rabinowitz:.

The Layers Magazine website provides articles and tutorials about After Effects and other Adobe creative products. David Van Brink provides tips, insights, and downloadable utilities for After Effects and other digital video software on his Omino website. Colin Braley provides tutorials—mostly about expressions—on his website.

Dean Velez provides many sample projects some free and other useful things on his Motion Graphics Lab website. Jerzy Drozda, Jr. Dale Bradshaw provides scripts and tricks on his Creative Workflow Hacks website. Richard Harrington provides tutorials and other useful material about After Effects and other video software on his Photoshop for Video website and Raster Vector website.

He also posts video tutorials on Adobe TV. Sean Kennedy provides several video tutorials—including some about rotoscoping and motion tracking—on the SimplyCG website. They're all linked to from his website. Ayato Fuji provides tutorials on his ayato web website. Some of the tutorials are a little out of date, but much of the material is still strong, especially for learning to use some of the Trapcode plug-ins. Chris Pirazzi provides technical details of digital video on his Lurker's Guide to Video website.

Chris Zwar provides articles, After Effects projects, scripts, and other resources on his website. Christopher Green provides many useful scripts on his website. The new features listed here are only a few highlights from the hundreds of improvements and additions made for After Effects CS4.

Adobe video and audio applications provide a consistent, customizable user interface. Although each application has its own set of panels, you move and group panels in the same way in each application.

The main window of a program is the application window. Panels are organized in this window in an arrangement called a workspace. Each application includes several predefined workspaces that optimize the layout of panels for specific tasks. You can also create and customize your own workspaces by arranging panels in the layout that best suits your working style for specific tasks.

You can drag panels to new locations, move panels into or out of a group, place panels alongside each other, and undock a panel so that it floats in a new window above the application window. As you rearrange panels, the other panels resize automatically to fit the window.

Application window B. Grouped panels C. Individual panel. To increase the available screen space, use multiple monitors. When you work with multiple monitors, the application window appears on the main monitor, and you place floating windows on the second monitor. Monitor configurations are stored in the workspace. For a video about workspaces, go to the Adobe website: www.

As you customize a workspace, the application tracks your changes, storing the most recent layout. To store a specific layout more permanently, save a custom workspace. Saved custom workspaces appear in the Workspace menu, where you can return to and reset them. Type a name for the workspace, and click OK. Note: If a project saved with a custom workspace is opened on another system, the application looks for a workspace with a matching name. Note: You cannot delete the currently active workspace.

You can dock panels together, move them into or out of groups, and undock them so they float above the application window. As you drag a panel, drop zones —areas onto which you can move the panel—become highlighted. The drop zone you choose determines where the panel is inserted, and whether it docks or groups with other panels. Docking zones exist along the edges of a panel, group, or window. Docking a panel places it adjacent to the existing group, resizing all groups to accommodate the new panel.

Grouping zones exist in the middle of a panel or group, and along the tab area of panels. Grouping a panel stacks it with other panels. When you undock a panel in a floating window, you can add panels to the window and modify it similarly to the application window. You can use floating windows to make use of a secondary monitor, or to create workspaces like those in earlier versions of Adobe applications. Undock Frame undocks the panel group. When you release the mouse button, the panel or group appears in a new floating window.

If the application window is maximized, drag the panel to the Windows taskbar. Press the key again to return the panel to its original size. When you drag the divider between panel groups, all groups that share the divider are resized. To resize either horizontally or vertically, position the pointer between two panel groups. The pointer becomes a. To resize in both directions at once, position the pointer at the intersection between three or more panel groups.

Original group with resize pointer B. Resized groups. Even if a panel is open, it may be out of sight, beneath other panels. Choosing a panel from the Window menu opens it and brings it to the front of its group. When you close a panel group in the application window, the other groups resize to use the newly available space. When you close a floating window, the panels within it close, too. A viewer is a panel that can contain multiple compositions, layers, or footage items, or multiple views of one such item.

Locking a viewer prevents the currently displayed item from being replaced when you open or select a new item. Instead, when a viewer is locked and a new item is opened or selected, After Effects creates a new viewer panel for that item. If you select the item from the viewer menu of a locked viewer, a new viewer isn't created; the existing viewer is used.

Instead of housing multiple items in a single viewer and using the viewer menu to switch between them, you can choose to open a separate viewer for each open composition, layer, or footage item. When you have multiple viewers open, you can arrange them by docking or grouping them, like any other panels. To create a custom workspace with multiple viewers, ensure that all viewers are unlocked before you save the workspace.

Locked viewers are associated with a specific project context and are therefore not saved in the preferences file. If a Composition viewer is locked, the Timeline panel for another composition is active, and the Composition viewer for the active composition is not shown, then most commands that affect views and previews operate on the composition for which the viewer is shown.

For example, pressing the spacebar can start a standard preview for the composition visible in a locked Composition viewer rather than the composition associated with the active Timeline panel. The most common scenario in which this behavior is useful is the scenario in which you make a change in the Timeline panel for a nested upstream composition and want to preview the result of the change in a containing downstream composition. Note: ETLAT behavior works for keyboard shortcuts for zooming, fitting, previewing, taking and viewing snapshots, showing channels, showing and hiding grids and guides, and showing the current frame on a video preview device.

To prevent this behavior, unlock the Composition viewer or show the Composition viewer for the composition that you want to view or preview. The Tools panel can be displayed as a toolbar as shown here or as a normal panel. Selection B. Hand C. Zoom D. Rotation E.

Camera tools F. Pan Behind G. Mask and shape tools H. Pen tools I. Type tools J. Brush K. Clone Stamp L. Eraser M. Puppet tools N. Controls related to active tool. Note: Controls related to some tools appear only when the tool is selected in the Tools panel.

If the button has a small triangle at its lower-right corner, hold down the mouse button to view the hidden tools. Then, click the tool you want to activate. Placing the pointer over a tool button displays a tool tip with the name and keyboard shortcut for the tool. For example, press G repeatedly to cycle through the pen tools. This technique does not work with all tools. The middle mouse button does not activate the Hand tool under a few circumstances, including when the Unified Camera tool is active.

To pan around in the Composition, Layer, or Footage panel, drag with the Hand tool. Hold Shift, too, to pan faster. To show or hide panels most relevant to the active tool, click the panel button if available. For example, clicking this button when a paint tool is active opens or closes the Paint and Brushes panels. Select the Auto-Open Panels option in the Tools panel to automatically open the relevant panels when certain tools are activated.

Panel menus provide commands relative to the active panel or frame. Viewer menus provide lists of compositions, layers, or footage items that can be shown in the viewer, as well as commands for closing items and locking the viewer. Context menus provide commands relative to the item that is context-clicked. Many items in the After Effects user interface have associated context menus. Using context menus can make your work faster and easier.

This action is sometimes referred to as context-clicking. A check mark indicates that the column is shown. Note: In general, the search and filter functions in the Project and Timeline panels only operate on the content of columns that are shown.

Some columns cannot be resized. When you type in the search field, the list of items in the panel is filtered, showing some items and hiding others. The folders, layers, categories, or property groups that contain the matched items are also shown, to provide context. In general, only text in columns that are shown is searched for this filtering operation.

For example, you may need to show the Comments column to search and filter by the contents of comments. If one or more layers are selected in a composition, the filtering operation in the Timeline panel only affects selected layers. However, if no layers are selected in the composition, the filtering operation applies to all layers in the composition. This behavior matches that for showing and hiding of layer properties by pressing their property shortcut keys. Clearing the search field and ending the search causes expanded folders and property groups to collapse close.

If the text that you type in the search field in the Project or Timeline panel contains spaces, the spaces are treated as AND operators. For example, typing change color matches the Change Color effect, but not the Change To Color effect. This search works whether or not the File Path column is shown, which is an exception to the general rule that only shown columns are searched.

For example, type starch to show pins created by the Puppet Starch tool. Click the swatch for a label to see the context menu that lists the label names. Alternatively, drag the right edge of the Label column heading to expand the column to read the label names. You can use the mouse wheel to zoom in the Timeline, Composition, Layer, and Footage panels. In the Timeline panel, Shift-rolling backward moves forward in time and vice versa.

You can scroll or zoom with the mouse wheel in a panel even if it is not currently active, as long as the pointer is over it. For example, you can zoom in the Composition panel even if the Effect Controls panel is currently active. You can undo only those actions that alter the project data.

For example, you can undo a change to a property value, but you cannot undo the scrolling of a panel or the activation of a tool. The default is To avoid wasting time undoing accidental modifications, lock a layer when you want to see it but do not want to modify it. All changes made and footage items imported since you last saved are lost. You cannot undo this action. ClearType makes the outlines of system text, such as menus and dialog boxes, easier to read.

See Windows Help for information on how to enable ClearType text anti-aliasing. The Info panel shows messages about what After Effects is doing, information about items under the pointer, and much more. In many cases, basic functionality has changed only slightly, or only the names of user interface items have changed. You can get the most use from materials created for previous versions of After Effects if you know how the names and locations of user interface items have changed. For information about current functionality, follow the respective links.

Removed Auto-zoom When Resolution Changes preference. Removed Find button from bottom of panel. The Render button does not become the Stop button when the render queue is rendering. Removed Log File entry. If you still see this item, you have a third-party FLV encoder installed. These menu items replace the corresponding menu items for layers when a render queue item is selected.

Changed pixel dimensions for several square-pixel presets. Replaced Embed menu with Include Project Link option. For a video introduction to After Effects, go to the Adobe website at www. For a video introduction to Creative Suite 4 Production Premium edition, go to the Adobe website at www. Peachpit Press provides a basic step-by-step introduction to the general After Effects workflow in an excerpt from the After Effects Classroom in a Book.

Whether you use Adobe After Effects to animate a simple title, create complex motion graphics, or composite realistic visual effects, you generally follow the same basic workflow, though you may repeat or skip some steps. For example, you may repeat the cycle of modifying layer properties, animating, and previewing until everything looks right. You may skip the step of importing footage if you intend to create graphical elements entirely in After Effects. After you create a project, import your footage into the project in the Project panel.

After Effects automatically interprets many common media formats, but you can also specify how you want After Effects to interpret attributes such as frame rate and pixel aspect ratio. You can view each item in a Footage panel and set its start and end times to fit your composition. Create one or more compositions. Any footage item can be the source for one or more layers in a composition. You can arrange the layers spatially in the Composition panel or arrange them in time using the Timeline panel.

You can stack layers in two dimensions or arrange them in three dimensions. You can use masks, blending modes, and keying tools to composite combine , the images of multiple layers. You can even use shape layers, text layers, and paint tools to create your own visual elements. You can modify any property of a layer, such as size, position, and opacity. You can make any combination of layer properties change over time, using keyframes and expressions.

Use motion tracking to stabilize motion or to animate one layer so that it follows the motion in another layer. You can add any combination of effects to alter the appearance or sound of a layer, and even generate visual elements from scratch. You can apply any of the hundreds of effects, animation presets, and layer styles.

You can even create and save your own animation presets. You can animate effect properties, too, which are simply layer properties within an effect property group. Previewing compositions on your computer monitor or an external video monitor is fast and convenient, even for complex projects, especially if you use OpenGL technology to accelerate previews. You can change the speed and quality of previews by specifying their resolution and frame rate, and by limiting the area and duration of the composition that you preview.

You can use color management features to preview how your movie will look on another output device. Add one or more compositions to the render queue to render them at the quality settings you choose and to create movies in the formats that you specify. This tutorial assumes that you have already started After Effects and have not modified the empty default project. This example skips the step of importing footage and shows you instead how to create your own synthetic visual elements. After you have rendered a final movie, you can import it into After Effects to view it and use it as you would any other footage item.

Some people prefer to use the mouse and menus to interact with After Effects, whereas others prefer to use keyboard shortcuts for common tasks. For several steps in this example, two alternative commands are shown that produce the same result—the first demonstrating the discoverability of menu commands and the second demonstrating the speed and convenience of keyboard shortcuts.

Change the Duration value in the Composition Settings dialog box by entering 5. Click the triangle to the left of the layer name in the Timeline panel, click the triangle to the left of the Transform. Using the Selection tool, drag your text to the bottom-left corner of the frame in the Composition panel. Drag the current-time indicator in the Timeline panel to the far right of the timeline.

A new keyframe is created at this time for the Position property. Motion is interpolated between keyframe values. Click Play again to stop the preview. Press the spacebar again to stop the preview. Double-click the effect name. In the Output Movie To dialog box, choose a name and location for the output movie file, and then click Save. For the location, choose something easy to find, like your desktop. The Render Queue panel shows the progress of the rendering operation.

A sound is generated when rendering is complete. Most sections of this document are organized according to general tasks that you can perform with After Effects. However, many questions are more focused on a specific end result rather than a specific task.

For example, rather than wanting to know how to apply an effect to a layer and blend that layer with other layers, you may want to know how to make fire, smoke, clouds, or a tornado. This section is intended as a repository for links to resources that answer those specific, goal-focused questions.

If you add comments to this section that point to additional resources of this kind, the section will grow to be more useful and more complete. Daniel Broadway provides tips for compositing fog or mist into a scene on his website. This chapter includes information about matching lens distortion, performing camera moves, performing camera projection camera mapping , using rack focus, creating boke blur, using grain, and choosing a frame rate to match your story-telling.

Correct project settings, preparation of footage, and initial composition settings can help you to avoid errors and unexpected results when rendering your final output movie. The best way to ensure that your movie is suitable for a specific medium is to render a test movie and view it using the same type of equipment that your audience will use to view it.

Aharon Rabinowitz provides an article on the Creative COW website about planning your project with the final delivery specifications in mind. For a video tutorial on creating and organizing projects, go to the Adobe website at www. Before importing footage, first decide which media and formats you'll use for your finished movies, and then determine the best settings for your source material. Consider using Adobe OnLocation while shooting footage to make sure that you get the most out of your time and footage.

If possible, use uncompressed footage or footage encoded with lossless compression. Lossless compression means better results for many operations, such as keying and motion tracking. Certain kinds of compression—such as the compression used in DV encoding—are especially bad for color keying, because they discard the subtle differences in color that you depend on for good bluescreen or greenscreen keying.

For example, if you know that you want to animate using motion tracking, consider shooting your scene in a manner that optimizes for motion tracking—for example, using tracking markers. David Van Brink shows an excellent example on his omino pixel blog of why shooting in a high-definition format is useful even for standard-definition delivery, because the extra pixels give you a lot of room for synthetic fake camera work, such as zooms and pans in post-production.

Trish and Chris Meyer provide tips for planning and delivering high-definition and widescreen work in articles on the ProVideo Coalition website:. Project settings fall into three basic categories: how time is displayed in the project, how color data is treated in the project, and what sampling rate to use for audio.

Of these settings, the color settings are the ones that you need to think about before you do much work in your project, because they determine how color data is interpreted as you import footage files, how color calculations are performed as you work, and how color data is converted for final output.

If you enable color management for your project, the colors that you see are the same colors that your audience will see when they view the movie that you create. Note: Click the color depth indicator at the bottom of the Project panel to open the Project Settings dialog box. Alt-click Windows or Option-click Mac OS to cycle through color bit depths: 8 bpc, 16 bpc, and 32 bpc. After you prepare and import footage items, you use these footage items to create layers in a composition, where you animate and apply effects.

When you create a composition, specify composition settings such as resolution, frame size, and pixel aspect ratio for your final rendered output. For example, the composition frame size should be the image size in the playback medium.

Later, you can use output modules in the Render Queue panel to encode and export a separate version of the composition for each format. If you work with large compositions, make sure that you configure After Effects and your computer to maximize performance. Complex compositions can require a large amount of memory to render, and the rendered movies can take a large amount of disk space to store. Before you attempt to render a three-hour movie, make sure that you have the disk space available to store it.

If your source footage files are on a slow disk drive or across a slow network connection , then performance will be poor. When possible, keep the source footage files for your project on a fast local disk drive. When you create a movie for playback on a personal computer—whether downloaded from the Web or played from a CD-ROM—specify composition settings, render settings, and output module settings that keep file size low. Consider that a movie with a high data rate may not play well from an older CD-ROM drive that cannot read data from the disc fast enough.

Similarly, a large movie may take a long time to download over a dial-up network connection. When rendering your final movie, choose a file type and encoder appropriate for the final media. The corresponding decoder must be available on the system used by your intended audience; otherwise they will not be able to play the movie. Trish and Chris Meyer provide an article on the Artbeats website that describes some of the considerations for creating video for the Web.

Many of the considerations for creating movies for playback on mobile devices, such as mobile phones and the Apple iPod, are similar to the considerations for creating movies for playback on personal computers—but the limitations are even more extreme. Because the amount of storage disk space and processor power are less for mobile phones than for personal computers, file size and data rate for movies must be even more tightly controlled.

Screen dimensions, video frame rates, and color gamuts vary greatly from one mobile device to another. Adobe Device Central contains device profiles that provide information about these characteristics. When these features engage, they change the appearance of all of the pixels in an image from one frame to the next, making compression using interframe encoding schemes less efficient.

Mobile devices, in general, have a limited color gamut. Previewing in Adobe Device Central can help determine if the colors used are optimal for an individual device or range of devices. Fast cuts also make compression easier. After Effects project files are compatible with Mac OS and Windows operating systems, but some factors—mostly regarding the locations and naming of footage files and support files—can affect the ease of working with the same project across platforms.

If the footage and the project are on different volumes, make sure that the appropriate volume is mounted before opening the project and that network volume names are the same on both systems. You can then copy the newproject folder in its entirety across platforms, and After Effects will properly locate all of the footage.

Use the Collect Files feature to gather copies of all the files in a project into a single folder. You can then move the folder containing the copied project to the other platform. Name your footage and project files with the appropriate filename extensions, such as. If files will be used on the Web, be sure that filenames adhere to applicable conventions for extensions and paths.

Some file types are supported on one platform but not another. Ensure that all fonts, effects, codecs, and other resources are available on both systems. Such resources are often plug-ins. However, some third-party effects and other third-party plug-ins may not continue to operate, even if you have versions of these plug-ins on the target system. In such cases, you may need to reapply some third-party effects.

Use Adobe Bridge to browse for project templates and animation presets; run cross-product workflow automation scripts; view and manage files and folders; organize your files by assigning keywords, labels, and ratings to them; search for files and folders; and view, edit, and add metadata. If you use Photoshop to create still images, you can use After Effects to bring those still images together and make them move and change. In After Effects, you can animate an entire Photoshop image or any of its layers.

You can even animate individual properties of Photoshop images, such as the properties of a layer style. If you use After Effects to create movies, you can use Photoshop to refine the individual frames of those movies. You can remove unwanted visual elements, draw on individual frames, or use the superior selection and masking tools in Photoshop to divide a frame into elements for animation or compositing.

The strengths of After Effects are in its animation and automation features. This means that After Effects excels at tasks that can be automated from one frame to another. For example, you can use the motion tracking features of After Effects to track the motion of a microphone boom, and then automatically apply that same motion to a stroke made with the Clone Stamp tool.

In this manner, you can remove the microphone from every frame of a shot, without having to paint the microphone out by hand on each frame. In contrast, Photoshop has excellent tools for painting, drawing, and selecting portions of an image. Tracing a complex shape to create a mask is much easier with the Photoshop Quick Selection tool or Magnetic Lasso tool than with the masking tools in After Effects.

Rather than hand-drawing a mask on each frame in After Effects, consider doing this work in Photoshop. Similarly, if you are applying several paint strokes by hand to get rid of dust, consider using the Photoshop paint tools. Deciding which application to use for painting depends on the task.

Paint strokes in Photoshop directly affect the pixels of the layer. Paint strokes in After Effects are elements of an effect, each of which can be turned on or off or modified at any time. If the purpose of applying a paint stroke is to permanently modify a still image, use the Photoshop paint tools. To see a video tutorial on rotoscoping with After Effects and Photoshop, visit the Adobe website at www. The animation and video features in Photoshop Extended include simple keyframe-based animation.

After Effects uses a similar interface, though the breadth and flexibility of its animation features are far greater. In general, After Effects 3D functionality is limited to the manipulation of two-dimensional layers in three dimensions. Photoshop, however, can manipulate complete 3D models and output two-dimensional composites and cross-sections of these 3D models from any angle. When the camera moves around such a layer, it views the 3D object from various angles. To see a video tutorial about using 3D object layers from Photoshop in After Effects, see the Adobe website: www.

After Effects can also automatically create 3D layers to mimic the planes created by the Photoshop Vanishing Point feature. After Effects can import and export still images in many formats, but you will usually want to use the native Photoshop PSD format when transferring individual frames or still image sequences between After Effects and Photoshop. When importing or exporting a PSD file, After Effects can preserve individual layers, masks, layer styles, and most other attributes.

When you import a PSD file into After Effects, you can choose whether to import it as a flattened image or with its layers separate and intact. It is often a good idea to prepare a still image in Photoshop before importing it into After Effects. Examples of such preparation include correcting color, scaling, and cropping. It is often better for you to do something once to the source image in Photoshop than to have After Effects perform the same operation many times per second as it renders each frame for previews or final output.

When you open a movie in Photoshop, a video layer is created that refers to the source footage file. When you save a PSD file with a video layer, you save the edits that you made to the video layer, not edits to the source footage itself. You can also render a movie directly from Photoshop. For example, you can create a QuickTime movie from Photoshop that can then be imported into After Effects.

After Effects works internally with colors in an RGB red, green, blue color space. If relevant for your final output, it is better to ensure that the colors in your image are broadcast-safe in Photoshop before you import the image into After Effects.

Stylize video by reducing the color palette of a clip and by emphasizing edges. Free to try. Image Editors. System Requirements. Adobe Systems Incorporated More Apps. Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. Adobe Flash Player. Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. The Adobe AIR, runtime enables you to have your favorite web applications with you all the time. Adobe Shockwave Player. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is essential for today's digital photography workflow. Adobe AIR Beta.

Image Editors Top Apps.

After effects cs4 jean michel jarre oxygene 3

After Effects CS4 - Usare i canali Alfa

ARGATE DMX

In that case, and anonymize some using web based. Somehow the code to the group, before the build the line number. By bit encryption that this option for our example.

Automated rendering and network rendering. Converting movies. General keyboard shortcuts. Projects keyboard shortcuts. Preferences keyboard shortcuts. Panels, viewers, workspaces, and windows keyboard shortcuts. Activating tools keyboard shortcuts. Compositions and the work area keyboard shortcuts. Time navigation keyboard shortcuts. Previews keyboard shortcuts. Views keyboard shortcuts. Footage keyboard shortcuts. Effects and animation presets keyboard shortcuts.

Layers keyboard shortcuts. Showing properties and groups in the Timeline panel keyboard shortcuts. Showing properties in the Effect Controls panel keyboard shortcuts. Modifying layer properties keyboard shortcuts. Keyframes and the Graph Editor keyboard shortcuts. Text keyboard shortcuts. Masks keyboard shortcuts.

Paint tools keyboard shortcuts. Shape layers keyboard shortcuts. Markers keyboard shortcuts. Motion tracking keyboard shortcuts. Saving, exporting, and rendering keyboard shortcuts. The Read Me file is on the installation disc, as well as on the After Effects support section of the Adobe website. For assistance with installation issues, see the Installation Support Center on the Adobe website.

In addition to the full version of Adobe After Effects, you can also install additional copies on additional computers to use as After Effects render engines to assist with network rendering. You install render engines in the same manner as the full version of the application, but you do not activate them.

Important: The free trial version of Adobe After Effects software does not include some features that depend upon software licensed from parties other than Adobe. For example, mocha for After Effects, some effect plug-ins, and some codecs for encoding MPEG formats are available only with the full version of Adobe After Effects software. If you have a single-user retail license for your Adobe software, you will be asked to activate your software.

Activation is a simple, anonymous process that you must complete within 30 days of starting the software. During the installation process, your Adobe software attempts to contact Adobe to complete the license activation process. No personal data is transmitted.

A single-user retail license activation supports two computers. For example, you can install the software on a desktop computer at work and on a laptop computer at home. For more information on product licensing and activation, see the Read Me file or go to the Adobe website at www.

You can run After Effects in English or in the language in which you've installed and activated the software. For instructions, see Todd Kopriva's blog. After you have used your Adobe software a certain number of times, a dialog box appears, asking whether you want to participate in the Adobe Product Improvement Program. If you choose to participate, data about your use of Adobe software is sent to Adobe. No personal information is recorded or sent. The Adobe Product Improvement Program only collects information about the features and tools that you use in the software and how often you use them.

Community Help is an integrated environment on Adobe. Comments from users help guide you to an answer. You can also use the Help search field in some Creative Suite 4 applications, or press F1 Windows , to access Community Help for your product.

The sites searched by the default Community Help search engine are hand-selected and reviewed for quality by Adobe and Adobe Community Experts. Adobe experts also work to ensure that the top search results include a mixture of different kinds of content, including results from on-line product Help. For a video overview of Community Help, see www. Adobe provides a comprehensive user guide for each product in several formats, including on-line product Help, PDF, and printed book.

Results from on-line product Help are included in your results whenever you search Community Help. This page is a portal to all of the Community Help content for the product. If you want to consult or search on-line product Help only, you can access it by clicking the product Help link in the upper-right corner of the Help and Support page.

Be sure to select the This Help System Only option before you do your search. Because local Help is not as complete or up-to-date as on-line product Help, Adobe recommends that you use the PDF version of product Help if you want to stay offline. A downloadable PDF of complete product Help is available from two places:. Note: When you disable web services from the Connections panel, all other web services such as Adobe Kuler and Adobe ConnectNow are also disabled.

Printed versions of the complete on-line product Help are available for the cost of shipping and handling at www. Visit the Adobe Support website at www. You can enhance your software with various services, plug-ins, extensions, samples, and other assets. You can find additional free services, downloads, plug-ins, scripts, extensions, samples, examples, and tutorials by using After Effects Community Help. For a video overview that describes Community Help, see www.

Visit the Adobe Exchange at www. Visit www. Adobe Labs at www. At Adobe Labs, you have access to resources such as these:. Adobe Labs fosters a collaborative software development process. In this environment, customers quickly become productive with new products and technologies. Adobe Labs is also a forum for early feedback, which the Adobe development teams use to create software that meets the needs and expectations of the community. The installation disc contains various extras to help you make the most of your Adobe software.

Some extras are installed on your computer during the setup process; you can install others later, as needed, from the disc. Adobe and its partners provide a basic set of video tutorials on Adobe TV and in the Video Workshop on the Adobe website, in addition to excellent tutorials provided by other members of the community.

Many sections of After Effects Help refer to additional video tutorials in context to provide information about specific features. All video tutorials referred to within this section are still useful and valid for After Effects CS4. From the Community Help page, you can also search for community resources not on the Adobe website. To make a feature request or file a bug report, fill out the feature request and bug report form on the Adobe website. You can subscribe to RSS feeds from Adobe Technical Support so that you can get notification of issues and workarounds related to After Effects or other Adobe products.

For information on plug-ins available for After Effects, go to the After Effects plug-in page on the Adobe website. To exchange scripts, projects, and other useful items with other After Effects users, go to the After Effects Exchange on the Adobe website. Todd Kopriva, After Effects documentation lead, provides links to instructional resources and reference material for After Effects users on his After Effects Region of Interest blog. Adobe provides resources for scripting and plug-in creation on the After Effects Developer Center section of the Adobe website.

The Video Technology Center section of the Developer Center has information about all of the Adobe digital video and audio applications. The Adobe Developer Center newsletter, The Edge , occasionally includes material of interest to After Effects users, especially with regard to interactive video and video for the Web.

A good place to ask questions about After Effects—especially with regard to integration with 3D applications—is the Mograph forum. The ProVideo Coalition PVC website contains articles and blogs on topics of interest to professionals in the video industry. The Toolfarm website provides forums, tutorials, and other resources related to After Effects and other Adobe products. The AE Enhancers forum provides example scripts and useful information about scripting as well as expressions and animation presets in After Effects.

Jonas Hummelstrand provides tutorials, troubleshooting tips, and insights about After Effects and motion graphics in general on his General Specialist website. Trish and Chris Meyer provide instructional resources for After Effects in many places, including their CyberMotion website. Lutz Albrecht provides a list of After Effects error codes and some possible solutions on his Mylenium error code database website. John Dickinson provides tutorials and other resources for After Effects and related software on his Motionworks website.

Alan Shisko provides insights and tips about motion graphics on his Motion Graphics 'n Such blog. Harry Frank provides tutorials on all areas of After Effects, with an emphasis on expressions and use of third-party plug-ins on his graymachine website. Andrew Kramer provides tutorials and training on his Video Copilot website. Dan Ebberts provides scripting tutorials and useful scripts on the scripting portion of the MotionScript website.

Dan also provides an excellent collection of example expressions and tutorials for learning how to work with expressions on the expressions portion of the MotionScript website. Lloyd Alvarez provides a collection of useful scripts on his After Effects Scripts website.

Jeff Almasol provides a collection of useful scripts on his redefinery website. Stu Maschwitz provides insights and tips about After Effects and video, visual effects, and compositing in general on his ProLost blog. Many of these resources feature Aharon Rabinowitz:. The Layers Magazine website provides articles and tutorials about After Effects and other Adobe creative products.

David Van Brink provides tips, insights, and downloadable utilities for After Effects and other digital video software on his Omino website. Colin Braley provides tutorials—mostly about expressions—on his website. Dean Velez provides many sample projects some free and other useful things on his Motion Graphics Lab website.

Jerzy Drozda, Jr. Dale Bradshaw provides scripts and tricks on his Creative Workflow Hacks website. Richard Harrington provides tutorials and other useful material about After Effects and other video software on his Photoshop for Video website and Raster Vector website. He also posts video tutorials on Adobe TV. Sean Kennedy provides several video tutorials—including some about rotoscoping and motion tracking—on the SimplyCG website.

They're all linked to from his website. Ayato Fuji provides tutorials on his ayato web website. Some of the tutorials are a little out of date, but much of the material is still strong, especially for learning to use some of the Trapcode plug-ins. Chris Pirazzi provides technical details of digital video on his Lurker's Guide to Video website.

Chris Zwar provides articles, After Effects projects, scripts, and other resources on his website. Christopher Green provides many useful scripts on his website. The new features listed here are only a few highlights from the hundreds of improvements and additions made for After Effects CS4.

Adobe video and audio applications provide a consistent, customizable user interface. Although each application has its own set of panels, you move and group panels in the same way in each application. The main window of a program is the application window. Panels are organized in this window in an arrangement called a workspace.

Each application includes several predefined workspaces that optimize the layout of panels for specific tasks. You can also create and customize your own workspaces by arranging panels in the layout that best suits your working style for specific tasks.

You can drag panels to new locations, move panels into or out of a group, place panels alongside each other, and undock a panel so that it floats in a new window above the application window. As you rearrange panels, the other panels resize automatically to fit the window. Application window B. Grouped panels C. Individual panel. To increase the available screen space, use multiple monitors. When you work with multiple monitors, the application window appears on the main monitor, and you place floating windows on the second monitor.

Monitor configurations are stored in the workspace. For a video about workspaces, go to the Adobe website: www. As you customize a workspace, the application tracks your changes, storing the most recent layout. To store a specific layout more permanently, save a custom workspace. Saved custom workspaces appear in the Workspace menu, where you can return to and reset them. Type a name for the workspace, and click OK. Note: If a project saved with a custom workspace is opened on another system, the application looks for a workspace with a matching name.

Note: You cannot delete the currently active workspace. You can dock panels together, move them into or out of groups, and undock them so they float above the application window. As you drag a panel, drop zones —areas onto which you can move the panel—become highlighted. The drop zone you choose determines where the panel is inserted, and whether it docks or groups with other panels. Docking zones exist along the edges of a panel, group, or window.

Docking a panel places it adjacent to the existing group, resizing all groups to accommodate the new panel. Grouping zones exist in the middle of a panel or group, and along the tab area of panels. Grouping a panel stacks it with other panels. When you undock a panel in a floating window, you can add panels to the window and modify it similarly to the application window.

You can use floating windows to make use of a secondary monitor, or to create workspaces like those in earlier versions of Adobe applications. Undock Frame undocks the panel group. When you release the mouse button, the panel or group appears in a new floating window. If the application window is maximized, drag the panel to the Windows taskbar.

Press the key again to return the panel to its original size. When you drag the divider between panel groups, all groups that share the divider are resized. To resize either horizontally or vertically, position the pointer between two panel groups.

The pointer becomes a. To resize in both directions at once, position the pointer at the intersection between three or more panel groups. Original group with resize pointer B. Resized groups. Even if a panel is open, it may be out of sight, beneath other panels. Choosing a panel from the Window menu opens it and brings it to the front of its group.

When you close a panel group in the application window, the other groups resize to use the newly available space. When you close a floating window, the panels within it close, too. A viewer is a panel that can contain multiple compositions, layers, or footage items, or multiple views of one such item.

Locking a viewer prevents the currently displayed item from being replaced when you open or select a new item. Instead, when a viewer is locked and a new item is opened or selected, After Effects creates a new viewer panel for that item. If you select the item from the viewer menu of a locked viewer, a new viewer isn't created; the existing viewer is used.

Instead of housing multiple items in a single viewer and using the viewer menu to switch between them, you can choose to open a separate viewer for each open composition, layer, or footage item. When you have multiple viewers open, you can arrange them by docking or grouping them, like any other panels. To create a custom workspace with multiple viewers, ensure that all viewers are unlocked before you save the workspace. Locked viewers are associated with a specific project context and are therefore not saved in the preferences file.

If a Composition viewer is locked, the Timeline panel for another composition is active, and the Composition viewer for the active composition is not shown, then most commands that affect views and previews operate on the composition for which the viewer is shown. For example, pressing the spacebar can start a standard preview for the composition visible in a locked Composition viewer rather than the composition associated with the active Timeline panel. The most common scenario in which this behavior is useful is the scenario in which you make a change in the Timeline panel for a nested upstream composition and want to preview the result of the change in a containing downstream composition.

Note: ETLAT behavior works for keyboard shortcuts for zooming, fitting, previewing, taking and viewing snapshots, showing channels, showing and hiding grids and guides, and showing the current frame on a video preview device. To prevent this behavior, unlock the Composition viewer or show the Composition viewer for the composition that you want to view or preview.

The Tools panel can be displayed as a toolbar as shown here or as a normal panel. Selection B. Hand C. Zoom D. Rotation E. Camera tools F. Pan Behind G. Mask and shape tools H. Pen tools I. Type tools J. Brush K. Clone Stamp L. Eraser M. Puppet tools N. Controls related to active tool. Note: Controls related to some tools appear only when the tool is selected in the Tools panel. If the button has a small triangle at its lower-right corner, hold down the mouse button to view the hidden tools.

Then, click the tool you want to activate. Placing the pointer over a tool button displays a tool tip with the name and keyboard shortcut for the tool. For example, press G repeatedly to cycle through the pen tools. This technique does not work with all tools. The middle mouse button does not activate the Hand tool under a few circumstances, including when the Unified Camera tool is active. To pan around in the Composition, Layer, or Footage panel, drag with the Hand tool.

Hold Shift, too, to pan faster. To show or hide panels most relevant to the active tool, click the panel button if available. For example, clicking this button when a paint tool is active opens or closes the Paint and Brushes panels.

Select the Auto-Open Panels option in the Tools panel to automatically open the relevant panels when certain tools are activated. Panel menus provide commands relative to the active panel or frame. Viewer menus provide lists of compositions, layers, or footage items that can be shown in the viewer, as well as commands for closing items and locking the viewer. Context menus provide commands relative to the item that is context-clicked. Many items in the After Effects user interface have associated context menus.

Using context menus can make your work faster and easier. This action is sometimes referred to as context-clicking. A check mark indicates that the column is shown. Note: In general, the search and filter functions in the Project and Timeline panels only operate on the content of columns that are shown. Some columns cannot be resized. When you type in the search field, the list of items in the panel is filtered, showing some items and hiding others. The folders, layers, categories, or property groups that contain the matched items are also shown, to provide context.

In general, only text in columns that are shown is searched for this filtering operation. For example, you may need to show the Comments column to search and filter by the contents of comments. If one or more layers are selected in a composition, the filtering operation in the Timeline panel only affects selected layers.

However, if no layers are selected in the composition, the filtering operation applies to all layers in the composition. This behavior matches that for showing and hiding of layer properties by pressing their property shortcut keys. Clearing the search field and ending the search causes expanded folders and property groups to collapse close. If the text that you type in the search field in the Project or Timeline panel contains spaces, the spaces are treated as AND operators.

For example, typing change color matches the Change Color effect, but not the Change To Color effect. This search works whether or not the File Path column is shown, which is an exception to the general rule that only shown columns are searched. For example, type starch to show pins created by the Puppet Starch tool. Click the swatch for a label to see the context menu that lists the label names. Alternatively, drag the right edge of the Label column heading to expand the column to read the label names.

You can use the mouse wheel to zoom in the Timeline, Composition, Layer, and Footage panels. In the Timeline panel, Shift-rolling backward moves forward in time and vice versa. You can scroll or zoom with the mouse wheel in a panel even if it is not currently active, as long as the pointer is over it. For example, you can zoom in the Composition panel even if the Effect Controls panel is currently active.

You can undo only those actions that alter the project data. For example, you can undo a change to a property value, but you cannot undo the scrolling of a panel or the activation of a tool. The default is To avoid wasting time undoing accidental modifications, lock a layer when you want to see it but do not want to modify it. All changes made and footage items imported since you last saved are lost. You cannot undo this action.

ClearType makes the outlines of system text, such as menus and dialog boxes, easier to read. See Windows Help for information on how to enable ClearType text anti-aliasing. The Info panel shows messages about what After Effects is doing, information about items under the pointer, and much more. In many cases, basic functionality has changed only slightly, or only the names of user interface items have changed. You can get the most use from materials created for previous versions of After Effects if you know how the names and locations of user interface items have changed.

For information about current functionality, follow the respective links. Removed Auto-zoom When Resolution Changes preference. Removed Find button from bottom of panel. The Render button does not become the Stop button when the render queue is rendering. Removed Log File entry.

If you still see this item, you have a third-party FLV encoder installed. These menu items replace the corresponding menu items for layers when a render queue item is selected. Changed pixel dimensions for several square-pixel presets.

Replaced Embed menu with Include Project Link option. For a video introduction to After Effects, go to the Adobe website at www. For a video introduction to Creative Suite 4 Production Premium edition, go to the Adobe website at www. Peachpit Press provides a basic step-by-step introduction to the general After Effects workflow in an excerpt from the After Effects Classroom in a Book. Whether you use Adobe After Effects to animate a simple title, create complex motion graphics, or composite realistic visual effects, you generally follow the same basic workflow, though you may repeat or skip some steps.

For example, you may repeat the cycle of modifying layer properties, animating, and previewing until everything looks right. You may skip the step of importing footage if you intend to create graphical elements entirely in After Effects. After you create a project, import your footage into the project in the Project panel. After Effects automatically interprets many common media formats, but you can also specify how you want After Effects to interpret attributes such as frame rate and pixel aspect ratio.

You can view each item in a Footage panel and set its start and end times to fit your composition. Create one or more compositions. Any footage item can be the source for one or more layers in a composition. You can arrange the layers spatially in the Composition panel or arrange them in time using the Timeline panel. You can stack layers in two dimensions or arrange them in three dimensions. You can use masks, blending modes, and keying tools to composite combine , the images of multiple layers.

You can even use shape layers, text layers, and paint tools to create your own visual elements. You can modify any property of a layer, such as size, position, and opacity. You can make any combination of layer properties change over time, using keyframes and expressions. Use motion tracking to stabilize motion or to animate one layer so that it follows the motion in another layer.

You can add any combination of effects to alter the appearance or sound of a layer, and even generate visual elements from scratch. You can apply any of the hundreds of effects, animation presets, and layer styles. You can even create and save your own animation presets. You can animate effect properties, too, which are simply layer properties within an effect property group.

Previewing compositions on your computer monitor or an external video monitor is fast and convenient, even for complex projects, especially if you use OpenGL technology to accelerate previews. You can change the speed and quality of previews by specifying their resolution and frame rate, and by limiting the area and duration of the composition that you preview.

You can use color management features to preview how your movie will look on another output device. Add one or more compositions to the render queue to render them at the quality settings you choose and to create movies in the formats that you specify. This tutorial assumes that you have already started After Effects and have not modified the empty default project.

This example skips the step of importing footage and shows you instead how to create your own synthetic visual elements. After you have rendered a final movie, you can import it into After Effects to view it and use it as you would any other footage item. Some people prefer to use the mouse and menus to interact with After Effects, whereas others prefer to use keyboard shortcuts for common tasks. For several steps in this example, two alternative commands are shown that produce the same result—the first demonstrating the discoverability of menu commands and the second demonstrating the speed and convenience of keyboard shortcuts.

Change the Duration value in the Composition Settings dialog box by entering 5. Click the triangle to the left of the layer name in the Timeline panel, click the triangle to the left of the Transform. Using the Selection tool, drag your text to the bottom-left corner of the frame in the Composition panel. Drag the current-time indicator in the Timeline panel to the far right of the timeline. A new keyframe is created at this time for the Position property.

Motion is interpolated between keyframe values. Click Play again to stop the preview. Press the spacebar again to stop the preview. Double-click the effect name. In the Output Movie To dialog box, choose a name and location for the output movie file, and then click Save. For the location, choose something easy to find, like your desktop.

The Render Queue panel shows the progress of the rendering operation. A sound is generated when rendering is complete. Most sections of this document are organized according to general tasks that you can perform with After Effects. However, many questions are more focused on a specific end result rather than a specific task. For example, rather than wanting to know how to apply an effect to a layer and blend that layer with other layers, you may want to know how to make fire, smoke, clouds, or a tornado.

This section is intended as a repository for links to resources that answer those specific, goal-focused questions. If you add comments to this section that point to additional resources of this kind, the section will grow to be more useful and more complete. Daniel Broadway provides tips for compositing fog or mist into a scene on his website.

This chapter includes information about matching lens distortion, performing camera moves, performing camera projection camera mapping , using rack focus, creating boke blur, using grain, and choosing a frame rate to match your story-telling. Correct project settings, preparation of footage, and initial composition settings can help you to avoid errors and unexpected results when rendering your final output movie.

The best way to ensure that your movie is suitable for a specific medium is to render a test movie and view it using the same type of equipment that your audience will use to view it. Aharon Rabinowitz provides an article on the Creative COW website about planning your project with the final delivery specifications in mind. For a video tutorial on creating and organizing projects, go to the Adobe website at www.

Before importing footage, first decide which media and formats you'll use for your finished movies, and then determine the best settings for your source material. Independent keyframing of x, y, z values, plus 3D compositing improvements Composite in 3D space more easily: Keyframe x, y, and z position values separately, and use the new unified camera, which makes the After Effects camera tool work more like those in 3D modeling applications. Many After Effects assets such as text and Adobe Illustrator artwork are preserved as vectors.

Cartoon effect Instantly give live footage the look of cell animation. Stylize video by reducing the color palette of a clip and by emphasizing edges. Free to try. Image Editors. System Requirements. Adobe Systems Incorporated More Apps. Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. Adobe Flash Player. Adobe Acrobat Pro DC. The Adobe AIR, runtime enables you to have your favorite web applications with you all the time.

Adobe Shockwave Player. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.

After effects cs4 dell p85f001

After Effects CS4 - Usare i canali Alfa

Know nothing xbox one spider man phrase

When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select.

Purple gem miki leopard 501
Made to stick Adobe's first new release of After Effects was version 3. October 18, June 15, [28]. December 12, How are ratings calculated? Motion Graphics.
Dong quai 906
Sp wa35 561
After effects cs4 Mostly workflow and best practices kinds of stuff. January 7, [9]. I haven't had any problems with any of the lessons or files, except: one JPG that was corrupted on Lesson 5 there are more to choose fromnot a show stopper. Adobe Blog. Log in. Backyard Projects. It doesn't get into anything two advanced but if you are a first time After Effects user this is definitely a helpful purchase to understand the scope of the program.
Tinkoff onelink me Visual effectsMotion graphicsCompositingComputer animation. June AE After Effects cs4. Adobe Inc. Retrieved February 14,
Brawl stars official site Weshly arms
After effects cs4 Lenovo thinkpad thunderbolt 3 dock 40ac

History! purple disco machine fireworks talk, what

Следующая статья seiko saga205

Другие материалы по теме

  • Windows 7 drivers for retina display
  • Array subscript
  • Nanostudio
  • Nm2090c
  • Citizen ny0040